///deek_media


The Pains of Being Pure at Heart – Belong [2011]

Posted in dream pop,indie pop,noise pop,shoegaze by deek on April 25, 2011

Currently the “Best Band With The Worst Name” title holder, The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart debuted in 2009 as a twee indie-rock act whose sound owed more than a little to Belle And Sebastian. But Pains showed a stronger propensity for rock, which explains the band’s choice of producer Flood (U2, Smashing Pumpkins, Nine Inch Nails) and mixer Alan Moulder (The Jesus And Mary Chain, Ride, My Bloody Valentine) for the new Belong. Those guys specialize in big rock sounds, and that’s exactly what Belong delivers in its opening track, “Belong,” which resembles the Pumpkins’ “Today” in its guitar dynamics. The guitars are also gloriously huge on “Even In Dreams,” and “Girl Of 1,000 Dreams” has a Jesus And Mary Chain ferocity, but Belong still has plenty of nuance. Flood also worked with Erasure quite a bit, so synthesizer-heavy songs like “The Body” and “My Terrible Friend”—which would have fit on the Pretty In Pink soundtrack—don’t feel out of place. Those songs, as well as the atmospheric “Anne With An E,” actually suit guitarist-vocalist Kip Berman’s breathy voice better than their more rocking siblings. “Heart In Your Heartbreak,” a perfect example of Pains as a more rocking Belle And Sebastian, hits Berman’s sweet spot vocally. More than anything, Belong shows ambition, with The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart clearly aiming for something bigger—a bigger sound, may be a bigger audience. It nailed the sound part. A larger audience seems inevitable. -avclub

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tUnE-YaRdS – w h o k i l l [2011]

Posted in experimental,indie pop,psychedelic pop by deek on April 25, 2011

One of the most talked about albums of 2009, if not one of the highest selling, was tUnE-yArDs’ debut effort BiRd-BrAiNs – and not just for all those rogue capital letters. Recorded entirely on digital tape and pieced together on a laptop, it seemed to redefine the concept of lo-fi recording. It was during live shows though that the buzz really built around Merrill Garbus (who is, in effect, tUnE-yArDs). Synchronised drums, loop pedals, an overwhelming sense of joy and the magical, theatrical presence of Garbus herself led people to whisper words like ‘religious experience’ and ‘genius’. Two years on, and Garbus appears to have distilled that live ambience into the recording studio. For, as good as BiRd-BrAiNs was (and it was, for the most part, outstanding), w h o k i l l represents a massive leap forward creatively. There’s an energy and atmosphere to w h o k i l l which seems to just pour off the record. In a world of identikit pop stars, it’s safe to say that you’ll not hear an album like this anywhere else this year. Opening track My Country sets the exhilarating tone early – a thumping, jumping beast of a song which is impossible to sit still to. The rhythm is irresistible, horns blast, and there’s even the odd glockenspiel in there, while dominating everything is Garbus’ tremendous voice, which manages to inject genuine soul into every note. Staggeringly, the rest of the album is of similar quality. It’s difficult to pick out a stand-out track, but Riotriot is certainly up there. A sole finger-picked ukulele sets the tone before building up beautifully as cacophonous drums and a saxophone join the party, until a delicious tribal rhythm strikes up. Doorstep is less frantic if no less effective, an addictive vocal line of “the policeman shot my baby as he crossed onto my doorstep” hinting at a dark undertone beneath the joyous melody. Es-So puts the loop pedals to good use, looping Garbus backing vocals and repeating a ridiculously addictive guitar riff. Like much of the rest of the album, it’s experimental yet utterly accessible, catchy without being annoying and strangely odd without being alienating. For Garbus has that mysterious ingredient to her that keeps you going back to her music – that ‘X-Factor’ before Simon Cowell bastardised the phrase. It’s there in the astonishing, horn-laden swagger of Bizness, in the wonderfully danceable Gangsta, and especially in the delirious rhythms of You Yes You. Even the less immediate tracks, such as Wooly Wooly Gong, have a unique charm revealed after a few plays. It’s an album that it’s impossible to ever imagine tiring of – and as soon as the closing beats of the superb Killa come to a halt, you just want to start it all over again. In a year that’s already been rather special for great albums, Merrill Garbus may well have produced the finest record of the year. -musicOMH

Tennis – Cape Dory [2011]

Posted in indie pop by deek on January 1, 2011

This Denver, Colorado-based band is made up of the husband-and-wife team Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley, who play laid back surf-tinged music that draws heavily from the girl group era. According to Denver Westword, the pair set out on a seven-month sailing trip on the Eastern seaboard where they started writing songs together as a “sort of a soundtrack” for their experiences. They first posted those songs online and attracted the attention of several high-profile music blogs, such as Gorilla vs. Bear. After dropping a 7-inch on the Fire Talk label and one on the Underwater Peoples imprint, they moved to Fat Possum for their long-playing debut. -prefixmag

Asobi Seksu – Fluorescence [2011]

Posted in dream pop,indie pop by deek on December 18, 2010

Asobi Seksu hit critical gold in 2006 with their sophomore record, Citrus. But the New York City-based act saw their stock fall with a less impressive, but still solid follow-up, 2009’s Hush, which represented a shift toward a much more subdued style. The band, which functions as a duo but plays as a quartet live, looks to remain on its mellow vibe here with track titles such as “Deep Weird Sleep,” “Ocean,” and “Perfectly Crystal” on Fluorescence. It is their fourth proper album and their second affair with Polyvinyl Records.

Tennis – Tennis (EP) [2010]

Posted in indie pop,lo-fi by deek on December 8, 2010

Tennis is Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore, a husband/wife duo. The idea for the project began one day a couple of years ago when Alaina made fun of Patrick for playing Tennis in college, which is an elitist rich man’s sport. A year later the two fled their hometown Denver to spend eight months sailing and exploring the North Atlantic coast. During their adventures they began writing music together documenting their experiences.

Wild Nothing- Gemini [2010]

Posted in dream pop,indie pop by umwut on August 25, 2010


Arcade Fire – The Suburbs [2010]

Posted in chamber pop,indie pop,indie rock by deek on August 16, 2010


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of Montreal – False Priest [2010]

Posted in funk,indie pop,neo psychedelia,psychedelic pop,soul by deek on August 14, 2010

Let no one say Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes is not adventurous. After releasing one of the decade’s wildest psychedelic pop albums in Hissing Fauna, Are You The Destroyer?, Of Montreal followed it up with 2008’s Skeletal Lamping, which was released on just about every format you can think of. Recently, and worked on a song for a Nick Jr. comp for Yo Gabba Gabba! For False Priest, Barnes went into the studio listening to Parliament/Funkadelic, which he plans to combine with the psychedelic work of his previous material as well as ’80s No Wave. While Barnes has a tendency of making such preposterous statements, he usually backs it up with solid recordings, which is more than can be said for most of his peers -prefixmag.

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Urban Legends – Secretly, Faithfully [2000]

Posted in indie,indie pop by jheisel on June 26, 2010

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uploaded by request…for all you thermals fans…

Dr. Dog – Shame, Shame [2010]

Posted in indie folk,indie pop by deek on April 26, 2010


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