///deek_media


Electric Wizard – Black Masses [2010]

Posted in doom,stoner by deek on October 31, 2010

Bongripper – Satan Worshipping Doom [2010]

Posted in doom,drone,sludge,stoner by deek on October 28, 2010

Chicago’s Bongripper return with their sixth release entitled “Satan Worshipping Doom.” First time on vinyl, this album is released on 2LP format with engineering by Dennis Pleckham of Comatose Studios and mastered by Collin Jordan of the Boiler Room. Four tracks clocking slightly under 60 minutes of life-destroying monolithic doom. Self-released and limited to 300. Free digital download with purchase.

Warpaint – The Fool [2010]

Posted in dream pop,neo psychedelia,shoegaze by deek on October 27, 2010

Emily Kokal’s singing — backed by bandmates Theresa Wayman and Jenny Lee Lindberg, and awash in reverb — could be mistaken for something ghostly, if Warpaint’s sound wasn’t so vitally alive behind her. Unwilling to coast on the pure beauty of the vocals on The Fool, this all-female quartet builds thick, muscled songs that Kokal’s otherwordly voice beds down in. These songs are expansive without sounding bloated, and noisy yet sharp. In fact, it’s in the pure strength of its noise that Warpaint shows us something new. These musicians know you don’t need to amp up the distortion to be noisy, and you don’t have to make everything blur at the edges to expand. All the songs here clock in around five minutes and build with a skilled patience. “Set Your Arms Down” and “Warpaint” ride on insistent beats while riffs thread clear paths through the track. The guitars often sound watery here, soaked in chorus-pedal effects, but they never lose their precision. Instead, their clarity cuts effectively through the smooth glide of the vocals and atmosphere of keys. The results, particularly in the album’s first half, are both beautiful and subtly heavy. These songs wear on you in the best way, luring you in with simple elements and then burying you deep in the details. “Now I’ve got you in the undertow,” Kokal sings, with a dangerous seduction, on “Undertow” and you can’t help but concede. Because when that song launches into a lean, funky groove, it’s both left-field surprising and completely organic. Similarly, the electro-pop start of “Bees” yields to a flurry of post-punk angles, while “Shadows” starts with humble folk and blows up into industrial-sized drums and Kokal’s shouts like a banshee. Warpaint builds a musical world in which there are no borders between this sound and that one. The band jumps around, indiscriminately, and we go along without looking back. In its intricacy, The Fool is a curiously eccentric pop record. But in its sheer power, it’s also a dynamic rock record. And while things do settle down in the second half, the band members don’t lose sight of their strengths. Sure, “Majesty” is long on the atmosphere of this record without ever earning its own pulse, and closer “Lissie’s Heart Murmur” is a little slow to get going. But next to them, you have a ballad like “Baby,” which, for once, holds onto its fragile start and it works as a counterpart to all the sound-stacking that goes on during the rest of the record. In the end, The Fool’s success comes in not cutting corners. No moment here settles for the cheap thrill, and in building these songs — carefully,and each with its own distinct materials — Warpaint comes off as an awfully confident band, one you should be listening to more often. – prefixmag

Zola Jesus – Valusia (EP) [2010]

Posted in darkwave,electropop,synth pop by deek on October 27, 2010

With her March EP, Stridulum, Nika Roza Danilova, better known to the blogosphere as Zola Jesus, made a confident move away from the lo-fi, doom-ridden, blown-out sounds of her previous studio output and toward a midway point between opera, goth rock and New Order synth dirges. Valusia, her second EP this year, has the same sound but a different purpose: This four-song stopgap is meant to ensure newcomers that she’s playing for keeps. There’s no retreating behind the fuzz again. Zola Jesus is out front for good, basically cornering the market on big, sweeping synth pop. On the excellent Valusia, Zola Jesus hooked up with a producer for the first time.Chris Coady, who has produced Yeah Yeah Yeahs and TV on the Radio, helms the boards on “Poor Animal,” giving it an even bigger-sounding sheen than the self-produced tracks on Stridulum. “Poor Animal” is as close to dance music as Zola Jesus can probably ever get. With its modest increase in tempo, it imagines an opera inside a three-day old rave. Coady’s bigger sound seemingly inspired the re-recorded version of “Sea Talk” — which originally appeared on Tsar Bomba — as well: There’s those distant, marching drums, the post-punk synths climbing toward the sun and Danilova’s voice floating above it all. Like Stridulum, the greatest strength of Valusia is that it gives us just enough to want to spend more time in Zola Jesus’ world, but not enough to subsist on. But if you were to put the two EPs together on one LP, it would form one of the year’s best albums. A full-length of material in this vein is due for a 2011 release, and if it’s as great as Valusia and Stridulum, Zola Jesus should break through in a big way. -prefixmag

How to Dress Well – Love Remains [2010]

Posted in ambient pop,dream pop,lo-fi,r&b by deek on October 27, 2010

Philosophy student Tom Krell approaches his self-recorded, lo-fi homage to the ’80s and ’90s R&B he loves with an academic eye, framing his debut, Love Remains—and the entire How To Dress Well concept—as an exploration of the way feelings fade over time. While he’s in love with the loverman sounds of Keith Sweat and Blackstreet, Krell’s grimy, ghostly versions of those bubble-baths-and-candlelight melodies aren’t really made for romancing: This is R&B minus the rhythm, with fragmentary beats echoing from the next room, buried under layers of ethereal ambient drones, reverb-drenched piano loops, and Krell’s Bon Iver-like multi-tracked falsetto. It’s lonely music, cold and haunting, and all the more elusive for Krell’s mostly indecipherable lyrics. There are brief glimpses through the fog, as when the “I was hoping for the rain / I was hoping for you” refrain breaks through “My Body,” but Krell keeps his on-bended-knee melodies buried behind the shadows of spectral hiss, evoking a long-neglected cassette tape. But for all its hermetic remove—spelled out by samples from Todd Haynes’ Safe on the opener, “You Hold The Water”—Love Remains is an immersive experience that transcends its chilliness (and speaker-crackling sonic limitations) through pure emotion, whether it’s the stroboscopic swirl of “Ready For The World” or the pocket symphony build of “Decisions.” Nothing wrong with a little bump and grind, even in the abstract. – the av club

Brian Eno – Small Craft on a Milk Sea [2010]

Posted in ambient,electronic by deek on October 27, 2010

Music can make life a cinematic experience. I’m writing this from a train ride to New York City, and Brian Eno’s new album Small Craft On A Milk Sea is shaping my view of the scenery as I whiz by. The opening track is gentle and the morning light dances off the fall leaves. But when the intensity of “Forms Of Anger” kicks in, other parts of the landscape pop out — patterns of fencing, graffiti on concrete, shifting heights of foliage. Eno makes two styles of music: songs that showcase vocals and personality and instrumental soundscapes. Small Craft On A Milk Sea, as the name implies, is the latter. And with or without the changing light of a train ride, these tunes alter my perception of the world around me, even with my eyes closed. The album came out of improvisations with two young electronic musicians. The first, Leo Abrahams, met Eno in a guitar shop. Abrahams was trying out a guitar and, as he put it, Eno “was happy I wasn’t playing ‘Stairway to Heaven’ with the amp turned up to 11. (So) he invited me to play on his album.” For the past seven years they’ve worked with such artists as Paul Simon and Grace Jones. Jon Hopkins, who plays piano and electronics, is the other standout collaborator. He and Eno worked on the last Coldplay album together, and the two performed with Abrahams at the Luminous Festival in Sydney, which Eno curated. Unlike many of Eno’s ambient albums, this one has varying moods — sometimes it lulls quietly, other times it’s fierce. -npr

Brendan Perry – Ark [2010]

Posted in darkwave by deek on October 23, 2010

As Dead Can Dance, Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard sold more than 2 million records worldwide. To this day, they remain 4AD’s biggest selling act. On the heels of a sold out Dead Can Dance world tour that took the duo to venues such as the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles and Le Palais des Congrès in Paris, Brendan Perry is set to release a new solo album entitled Ark. Ark is more reminiscent of the music Brendan has written for Dead Can Dance than his previous solo work, Eye Of The Hunter.

Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti – Before Today [2010]

Posted in lo-fi,neo psychedelia,psychedelic pop by deek on October 23, 2010

Ariel Pink (born Ariel Marcus Rosenberg on June 24, 1978) is a Los Angeles based experimental/pop musician. Pink boasts a cult following and endorsements from more widely known artists such as fellow founding Paw Tracks group Animal Collective. After years of recording in relative seclusion in the hills of Los Angeles, Ariel Pink (the first non-Animal Collective member on the Paw Tracks roster) made his official Paw Tracks debut with The Doldrums. Recording at home with a guitar, bass, keyboard, and 8-track (the drum sounds were created with his mouth). Ariel Pink blends Lite FM and warped lo-fi pop into something by turns beautiful and confusing. Some may find his personal yet detached approach highly addictive, while others may be instantly turned off by the obvious lo-fi production and the vocal drumtracks. -last.fm

Grinderman – Grinderman 2 [2010]

Posted in blues rock,psychedelic rock,punk blues by deek on October 23, 2010

Nick Cave brings the experiences and sounds of his 30-year career to the table with the second release from his latest musical project since the Bad Seeds, with more of the trademark soaring piano, crunchy guitar, violins and mandolins to create an experimental new album. -metacritic

The Black Keys – Brothers [2010]

Posted in blues rock,garage rock by deek on October 23, 2010

The latest album for the duo of Daniel Auerbach and Patrick Carney features two tracks produced with Danger Mouse. – metacritic

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